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20130101
20130101
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
want to save another parent from having to bury their child. >> reporter: the ntsb believes this device may make a difference. i passed. so that means the car would start? >> right. >> reporter: it's called an ignition interlock that keeps impaired drivers from starting their vehicles. if they've been drinking more alcohol than allowed by court -- >> most likely you'll get a fail. >> reporter: and then what? >> and then the car won't start. >> reporter: already required in 17 states, the ntsb now recommends all states require ignition interlocks for first-time offenders. >> if we can save ten lives, 100 lives, we will recommend what we think needs to be done to address impaired driving. >> reporter: the ntsb studied more than 100 wrong-way crashes over a five-year period. 60% of these accidents involved alcohol and many drivers had prior convictions for drunk driving. not everyone supports the recommendation. the american beverage institute points out that drunk driving fatalities are at historically low levels. that's little assurance for ginger's mother. >> the experience took away a
is chairman of ntsb. >> we've learned from accidents, plowed those lessons back, in they've been embraced and we're not seeing repeats of those same accidents. >> reporter: experts say two accidents in which human failure was at least partly to blame underscore that remains the biggest threat to safety. air france 447 crashed into the atlantic in 2009, killing 228. that same year, regional airline colgan air flight 447 crashed in buffalo, killing 50. >> colgan air was a watershed event for aviation safety, in particular, bringing the regional carriers up to standards with the major carriers. >> reporter: the safety culture is spreading. accident rates are dropping in russia, africa, latin america, the caribbean, and asia. despite the dramatic improvement experts say there's danger here. just when you start to think, it can't happen again, is often when you're the most vulnerable. tom cocostello, nbc news, washington. >>> stocks provided many 401(k)s, pensions, and other investors pretty good news last year. despite the bad economic news. traders get the day off but the dow was up 7.3%. th
that killed nine people in eastern oregon. the ntsb is looking into the conditions on interstate 84 and the guardrail the tour bus crashed through yesterday morning. more than 40 people were aboard the bus headed from las vegas to vancouver, canada. the bus was carrying mostly exchange students from south korea. >>> well, new york doctors say that secretary of state hillary clinton is making excellent progress in recovering from that blood clot. they also revealed that the close is in the space between the brain and the skull behind the right ear. they say that she did not have a stroke, that she will remain in the hospital for at least another day. president clinton visited her today. that blood clot was found after she suffered a concussion earlier this month and that happened when she stumbled and fell while she was sick with a stomach virus. doctors are giving clinton blood-thinning drugs to dissolve the clock and prevent new once. >> cbs reporter bigad shaban on how the clots can form. >>> reporter: secretary of state hillary clinton has a blood clot behind her right here in a
hersman is chairman of the ntsb. >> we have learned from accidents, we have plowed all of those lessons back in. they have been embraced in many cases, and we're not seeing repeats of those same accidents. >> reporter: but experts say two actions in which human failure was at least partly to blame. underscore that, remains the biggest threat to safety. air france 447 crashed into the atlantic in 2009, killing 228. that same year, regional airline, flight 3407, crashed in buffalo, killing 50. >> colgan air was a watershed event in aviation safety, in particular bringing the regional carriers up to standards with the major carriers. >> reporter: the safety culture is spreading, accident rates are dropping, in russia, africa, latin america. the caribbean and asia. despite the improvement in safety, experts say there is a real danger here. just when you start to think it can't happen again is very often when you're most vulnerable. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >> when we continue on this new year's eve, two men who have learned some hard lessons, now passing them on and making a diff
are heading to the site of a tour bus crash that killed 9 people in eastern oregon. the ntsb is looking into conditions on interstate 84 and the guardrail that the tour bus crashed through yesterday morning. more than 40 people were aboard the bus heading from las vegas to vancouver. the bus was carrying mostly exchange students from south korea. >>> you have been warned! ride the bumper cars at your own risk. and if you get hurt, you can't sue. today the state supreme court ruled a south bay doctor could not sue great america for breaking her wrist on the bumper cars. the court says there's a, quote, assumption of risk on the such rides. >>> well, earlier this evening we told you how just about everybody will see their paychecks shrink a little next year. but that's not the whole story. the bay area workers who will see their earnings jump- starting tomorrow. >> i mean, it's not the only reason why i donate, but why not? it's a win-win for everybody. >> on a day when many of you didn't have to work, there was plenty to be done. the last-minute rush to save a little money. moscow's red
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)